Shorts, Cookies, Discs, and Hardwood Oddities

As written here in a previous blog, about eight years ago I took on two partners and decided to make a radical change at Barney & Carey. The location in Sharon had functioned pretty well as a small, “full service” lumber company, but had really outgrown its tired facility. Both Barney & Carey and my…

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Unveiling the Holiday Spirit: Welcome Holly Wood!

Hey there! Guess what’s happening at the lumberyard? We’ve got something new in the mix, and we have no doubt it will sprinkle a bit of holiday cheer into your woodworking projects. Introducing Holly Wood, the latest addition to our lineup. This one’s sure to bring a touch of festive magic to whatever you’re creating. …

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You’ve Never Seen a Shipment of Hardwoods Like This Before

I have mentioned many times how difficult it can be to source high quality hardwoods. We have been diligent at keeping a good inventory of them—both domestic and exotic—in stock. However, sometimes, I just can’t find what is needed. Recently, one of our three owners, Dovi, told me that we were pretty depleted in a…

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A Treasure of Exotic Hardwoods

exotic hardwood table

As the old saw goes, “some days ya just get lucky!” Well, that is exactly what happened to me recently. A little background, first. As woodworkers, craftspeople, woodturners, etc., we have been intrigued with using some exotic hardwoods in our projects. Yes, many of these woods are very expensive and often hard to obtain, but…

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Barney & Carey Co. Inc. Honored With Membership in the LBM Century Club

Barney & Carey Co. Inc., of Avon, MA, has been named to LBM Journal magazine’s LBM Century Club, in recognition of the company’s 100 years of service to its community. “We’re honoring lumberyards with a century or more of service to their communities and to our industry,” says LBM Journal Publisher and Executive Editor Rick…

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The (Un)Usual Suspects: Really Unusual Walnut Slabs

Unusual Walnut Slabs

I am always on the hunt to buy wide hardwood slabs from our network of small sawmills, but it gets harder and harder to find them, as demand is high. Walnut is always scarce, because there just aren’t that many Walnut trees here in New England. Tree companies come across them occasionally when a homeowner…

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More Than Just Little Pieces of Wood, Because It’s More Than “Just a Hobby”

Most woodworking hobbyists don’t need long lengths of hardwood, especially if they are crafting a small project. Unfortunately, most hardwood companies are geared toward being strictly wholesale, with few exceptions. They don’t look kindly upon the person who asks if they will cut a two-foot piece of 8/4 x 10 Mahogany, or a one-foot piece…

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What’s New (and What Never Changes) at Barney & Carey Co.

specialty lumberyard

Like just about every other business right now, we at Barney & Carey Co. are often finding it harder to come up with certain materials; however, by reaching out to other mills and wholesalers, we have been able to get what we—and what our customers—need.  Quality can be an issue these days, especially with hardwoods. Whenever I am allowed to do so—even at some additional cost—I will personally go to these suppliers and hand pick our wood.

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Hobby Wood for Your Next Woodworking Project

hobby wood, avon ma

“Hobby wood” is just another name for shorter pieces of very high quality hardwoods and softwoods. I never fail to be astounded at some of the completed small projects our customers bring in to show us, from simple cutting boards to magnificent mantle clocks, bird carvings, and just about anything you can imagine…

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All About Reclaimed Wood & Antique Lumber

reclaimed wood avon, ma

We are always on the lookout to purchase reclaimed and antique lumber, and will travel considerable distances to get it! This consists of beams, joists, rafters, flooring, and siding from buildings that are demolished or renovated, ideally from mills that were constructed in the 1800’s or early 1900’s. The age makes a huge difference, because almost all of the timbers that went into these buildings was from “old growth” forests. Species like Southern Yellow Pine, Douglas Fir, Red and White Oak, and Eastern White Pine, all grew slowly in very dense forests, competing for every ray of sunlight. Many saplings and smaller trees were crowded out, while the survivors grew tall and straight, with few branches, and few knots in the wood.

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